Math Energizers

10 mins a day - Number Activities
The following are activities that will provide ongoing practice of Key Skills in Number. They are short fun activities that can be done at any time of day such as;
-between lessons
-before play
-before going to Assembly/home
-informal 'carpet' sessions
-before introducing the next mathematical topic
-revision
These sort of activities will keep a numerical concept alive in children's minds and will help them refine their mental techniques. The golden rule is little and often! Many activities are suitable for a variety of levels by varying the numbers accordingly.
Counting to ten
Pinned on me 
Write a number between one and ten and stick it on a child's back so that the children can see it. They give the first child clues about the number without using it's name. For example, they may say "it's less than 5" or "Its only got straight lines" . How quickly can the first child guess the number?
Forwards and Backwards
Count forwards up to a given number and then back down again. Repeat activity starting at different numbers and up to different target numbers then back down again to the starting number.
Counting to twenty
Guess which one?
Tell the children you have a number less than 12 in your pocket. They have three questions to ask about the number. You can only answer 'yes' or 'no'. For example they may ask, 'Is it less than 6' of 'Does it have two digits?' When they have guessed yours, the children take turns to choose a number. Encourage the children to think about their questions. ie. 'Is it even?'
Bigger than, smaller than
Give the children two numbers e.g. 5 and 15. They must name three numbers which are between these two limits (ie. more than 5 and less than 15) . Make the activity more difficult by allowing only non-consecutive numbers. For example, with limits more than 9 and less than 16: ten, eleven, twelve.
Before and after
Say a number and a child has to say the number which comes immediately before and after the number. Make the activity more difficult by saying the numbers which came next but one before and after the target number or when picked the boys say the number after the last stated number and the girls say the number before.
Number Lines - Show a blank number line if the first marker is 0 and the end marker is 10, What is this number? Where would 6 go.
Number Names
Snap - Show a number name card i.e. "twelve" and ask the children "What is this number?"
Letter sort -You need Number cards 1 to 20, one for each child in the group and a board to write on. Give each child a card. Say, 'Anyone holding a number which begins with a 'T' stand up or 'Anyone holding a number which ends in 'e' ...etc. Check each time by writing the relevant number names on the board.
Matching Numbers - Give each child a number card between 0 - 20 show them a number name card i.e. 'sixteen'. If they have the corresponding number i.e. 16 they show their card.
Give each child a number name card between 0 - 20 i.e. 'four' show the number '4' and the children who have the corresponding number name card have to show their card.
Ordinal Numbers
First to fifth -You need cubes . Have the children sitting in a circle. In unison count in ordinals around the circle, pointing to each child in turn: first, second, third .... Instead of saying 'fifth' the fifth child takes a cube and stands up. Start again at first with the next child, and continue until you reach the’fifth’. Again this child takes a cube and stands up. Continue in this way, missing out any child standing with a cube. Finally all the children except one should be standing. That child is the winner and takes two cubes. Repeat starting at a different place in the circle. Play several times or until someone has collected five cubes.
Counting to 100
Two's hard three's even harder - Have the children sitting in a circle. Count round the circle in two's , children taking it in turns to say one number each: two, four, six... Vary the starting number, starting at twenty three, twenty five, twenty seven, twenty nine...
Count in threes. Tell the children to say the missing two numbers softly to themselves to help. For example, the first child says five, the second child whispers six, seven and says eight aloud, the third child whispers nine, ten and says eleven aloud and so on. Count in 5s, 10s.
Which Numbers? - Give the children simple problems such as: Name three numbers which are more than 24 and less than 42.
Addition: Counting on to ten
Story time - Have the children sitting in pairs and tell them stories involving simple addition. For example: My cat had three kittens. How many cats do I have altogether? Fred's Mum gave him three sticky buns . Then his dad gave him two more. How many has he got now? There were three runners at the starting line and four more joined them. How many runners were there ready to go?
Addition: Number bonds to 10
Tell Me - What can you tell me about the number 10 i.e. 6 + 4 = 10. It's one after 9 etc.
Clapping for ten - When dismissing children, choose one child. Clap three times. That child completes the ten by clapping seven times. Choose another child and clap five times. Continue, choosing different children,. A variation involves the children taking turns to choose a friend and clapping a number at them. The friend must complete the ten claps.
Stories of 10 - Make stories up for 7 + 3. A flower had 7 red petals and 3 blue petals. How many petals altogether ar there?
Adding three one digit numbers
Story Addition - Tell the children stories involving addition for example: The shark is feeling greedy. He eats three small sea-horses, two large flat fish and then one octopus. How many things has he eaten?
Subtraction
I started with... Start by saying: "I started with 20p and I bought something for 2p. Then I had 18p left." Point to a child to continue: "I started with 18p and I bought something for 3p, then I had 15p left." If correct, that child chooses another to go on. Continue until you have no money left. Start again, always with 20p. No-one is allowed to spend more than 4p at a time.
Numbers to 1000
Address the whole class: I have a number in my pocket. Give the children three clues about the number, e.g. It has four tens. It is less than 300 and more than 200. Its digits add up to 9. Can the children guess your number?
Repeat by asking three of four children to stand outside while you and the remainder of the class choose a number and three clues. When the children come back in give them the clues and ask them to guess the number. Repeat for other groups of children.
Cubes
Count, as a class, in ones, starting at any 3- digit number. One hundred and twenty-one, one hundred and twenty two,... Once the children are confident, count around the class, pointing at the next child, who says the next number in the chant.
Count, as a class, in tens, starting at any 3-digit number. Three hundred and seventy-six, three hundred and eighty-six, three hundred and ninety-six, four hundred and six, ... Once the children are confident, count around the class, pointing at the next child, who says the next number in the chant. Ensure you choose a child who is confident to count over the difficult numbers (eg from 396 to 406).

 

Place value Write thirty 3-digit numbers on pieces of paper and give one to each child. The children keep their numbers hidden from everyone else. They work in pairs to find their partner's number, by asking questions, eg Does your number have more than five hundreds? Does it have more than eight hundred? Does it have six hundreds? Does it have more than five tens? The children can only give yes or no answers.

Numbers over 1000
Limits - Give the children two 4 - digit numbers as limits, e.g. more than 4500 and less than 5000. The children call out numbers which lie within this range. Write a selection on the board. Choose a child to point to the largest number on the board. Repeat for different limits, making the range narrower, e.g. more than 3600 and less than 3900. The activity can be varied by specifying various criteria for the numbers e.g. numbers with a '5' in the tens place, or numbers with no hundreds, or numbers with a '0' in the units place.

Fractions
Halves - 'Throw' a number, e.g. sixteen, at a child, who must 'throw' half back, i.e. eight. If correct, then that child throws a different (even) number to another child, who must throw half back. Ensure the children answer as quickly as they can. Continue around the class. A good rule is to let boys choose girls, and girls choose boys.
Equivalent Fractions 
Choose a child and say a simple fraction, ie one half. The child says the matching (equivalent) fraction, eg two quarters. That child chooses another child to say another matching fraction, eg three sixths. Continue as far as possible. Repeat, starting with another simple fraction, eg one third.

 

Patterns
Four Dice - Divide the class into two teams each with two dice. Team A collect odd numbers, Team B collect even numbers. On a count of three, two children in each team throw a dice. Write the numbers on the board for the children to add. If the total is odd, Team A collect a point. If the total is even, Team B collect a point.
Continue until one team has ten points.

Number Sequences
Choose a child and say a number, e.g. ten. That child adds a small number, and say the total to another child, e.g. fourteen, who adds the same small number, eighteen. Continue the sequence for ten or so terms.
Repeat for different sequences.
Addition
Adding multiple of 10
Two Dice - Divide the class into two teams and give each a dice, Draw two columns on the board, headed Team A and Team B. Team A say a 2-digit number e.g. forty seven. Team B throw the dice, e.g. 5 and add that many tens (50) to the first number: ninety seven. Write the answer in their column. The teams repeat, reversing roles. the first team to have six numbers in their column, each starting with a different digit are the winners.
Thirteen dice 
Divide the children into four teams and give each team three dice (retaining one for yourself). Choose a target number, eg 500 and write it on the board. Each team throws their three dice (eg 3, 5, 1) and makes a 3-digit number (eg 531). Throw your dice (eg 2) and each team adds that many tens (20) to their first number. The team with the total closest to the target number scores a point. Repeat until one team has three points.

 

Adding two 2-digit numbers 
Choose a child to write a 2-digit number on the board. Choose another child to write a different 2-digit number beneath the first. Read both numbers aloud . Ask the class to try and add the two numbers mentally. Write three numbers on the board (one of which is the correct answer). Which one is correct? Repeat.

Adding two 3 digit numbers
Twelve dice - Divide the class into four teams and give each team 3 dice. The teams throw their dice (eg 1, 4, 3) and create 3- digit numbers (eg 431), and write them down. Each team then throws two dice only (eg 5, 3) and creates a 3- digit number with '0' in the units place (eg 350). The teams add the two numbers (eg 431 + 350 = 781), and the team with the total closest to 777 wins that round. Repeat several times.

 

Taking away 100 'Throw a 3-digit number to a child, eg nine hundred and eighty six, who subtracts 100 and 'throws' it to another child. That child subtracts 100 and 'throws' the number on to another child. Continue, until you reach a 2-digit number. Repeat with different 3-digit numbers (ensure they are large).

Multiplication
Counting in two, fives and tens
Count in twos in unison, holding up one finger for each number spoken. Stop the count and look at the number of fingers standing up, e.g. six, six twos are twelve. Repeat this process for the fives and the tens. Encourage children to memorise the chant in each case, matching it to the fingers. This will help them find how many twos (or fives or tens) by relating to their fingers. This method is also used in the Infant Simmering Activities.

x2, x5, and x10 tables
Doubling - Write ten numbers on the board (multiples of two, five or ten). Choose a child, who selects a number, e.g. 15, and says a multiplication fact to match : three fives are fifteen. Switch rapidly between children, pointing at them in turn. the children should be ready when it is their turn.
Doubling
Choose a child and say a small number, e.g. three. That child doubles it, and says the answer aloud, i.e. six, pointing to another child. the second child doubles again, i.e. twelve, and points to another. If the numbers get too large, start again.
x9 Tables 
Count in tens in unison. Move on to counting in nines. Remind the children that when counting in nines, the tens digits go up in ones, e.g.nineeighteen (one ten), twenty-seven (two tens), thirty-six (three tens) ...It might also help to point out that in each multiple the digits add up to nine. Once the children are confident, count around the class, pointing at the next child, who says the next number in the chant. count up to ninety, and then back down to nine.
Counting in threes
Play Fizz-buzz - Count around the class, each child saying the next number in the chant: one, two, three, four, five ... However, rather than a child saying a number in the x3 table, they instead say 'Fizz'. If the number is in the x5 table they say 'Buzz'. So the count becomes: one, twofizz, fourbuzz, fizzseven, eightfizz, buzzeleven...
To help the children, write the multiples of three on the board where they can be seen (do not write the multiples of five). The children will enjoy this game, and it will take quite a lot of practice for them to become confident.
Counting in fours, sixes and eights
Play 'Zap-buzz' (a variety of Fizz-buzz). Count around the class, each child saying the next number in the chant: one, two, three, four, five,... However rather than a child saying a number in the x4 table, they instead say 'Zap'. If the number is in the x5 table they 'Buzz'. So the count becomes one, two, three, zap, buzzsix, sevenzapninebuzzeleven... To help the children , write the multiples of four on the board,
Play 'Whiz-buzz', as above, but for multiples of six and five. If a number is in the x6 table. the children say 'Whiz'. The count become: one, two, three, four, buzz, whizseven eight, nine,....

 

Division
Dividing by 2, 5 and 10 - Choose a child and say a multiple of 2, 5 or 10, e.g. forty. That child replies with one of the number 's factors, e.g. five. Say the same number to another child, who says a different factor, e.g. ten. Repeat for another child (only '2' remains as a factor). Repeat, reminding the children that they are only looking for 2, 5 or 10 as factors. Some numbers will have all three as factors, some only one, e.g.{"Italic" on} 25.{"Italic" off}

Halving
Choose a child and say an even number, e.g. sixteen. He halves it and says the answer to another child, i.e. eight. She halves it again and says the answer to another child. Continue as far as possible (i.e. to the first odd number) Repeat for different numbers.

 

Tables with missing numbers
A Dice - Write these multiplication facts, with missing numbers on the board.

3 x ** = 9 7 x ** = 35 1 x ** = 5 9 x ** = 18
8 x ** = 32 6 x ** = 12 12 x ** = 12 10 x ** = 20
7 x ** = 21 4 x ** = 24 8 x ** = 40 2 x ** = 16
Choose a child to throw the dice and say the number aloud. Which 'hole' does the number fit into? Ask the child to write the number in the appropriate space. Continue, with different children, until the multiplications are complete.
10 mins a day - Shape Activities
The following are activities that will provide ongoing practice of Key Skills in Shape. Many of the activities are suitable for a variety of levels with a little adaptation.
3d Shapes
Feely bag
Pick a shape from a bag and the children name it orally/ and or find its written name from some shape name cards.
Describe a shape and the children guess the shape.
Pick a shape but don't show it to the children. They can ask three question before guessing the shape.ie 'Has it got 3 corners?'.
Shape Names
Show a written shape name. The child picks the correct shape for the written name.
The child is given a shape and chooses the correct written name for that shape.
Pick a shape from a bag and the children name it orally/ and or find its written name from some shape name card.
Hidden shapes
Find a given shape in objects in and around the classroom or which can be seen from the classroom window. "Can any-one find any cuboids in our classroom?"
Missing Shapes
Place a selection of shapes on a tray. Let the children study them then cover the tray with a sheet and remove one or more shapes. Show the children the tray again and they name what has been removed.
Remember the shapes
Place a selection of shapes on a tray (e.g. large and small cubes, large and small cuboids etc). Cover the tray and working in groups of three or four, the children list all of the shapes on the tray they can remember.
2d Shape
Feely bag
Pick a shape from a bag and the children name it orally/ and or find its written name from some shape name cards.
Describe a shape and the children guess the shape.
Pick a shape but don't show it to the children. They can ask three question before guessing the shape.ie 'Has it got 3 sides?'.
Shape Names
Show a written shape name. The child picks the correct shape for the written name.
The child is given a shape and chooses the correct written name for that shape.
Pick a shape from a bag and the children name it orally/ and or find its written name from some shape name card
Hidden shapes
Find a given shape in objects in and around the classroom or which can be seen from the classroom window. "Can any-one find any rectangles in the classroom?"
Draw a Shape
Describe a shape to the children and they have to draw it from the description.
Draw a picture using shapes from given instruction. ie. 'Draw a large square for the body of a house.
Put a triangle on top of the square for the roof with its point at the top' etc.
Symmetry
Half a Letter
Show half a capital letter written on a piece of card. When the letter is completed what will the letter be?
Angles 
Right angles
Look around the room and ask the children to identify all the examples of right angles they can see. Repeat this activity looking for acute angles (ie, less than 90 degrees) or obtuse angles (ie. more than 90 degrees).
Directions
A Pathway
Agree which direction north is then find south, east and west. One child stands in one place in the classroom and names where he wants to go. The class gives directions to the child so avoiding all furniture. ie 'turn to face north, walk two paces, turn to face east, walk three paces' etc.
Position
Hidden Treasure
Draw a 5x5 coordinate grid on the board. Write a pair of coordinates on a piece of paper but keep it hidden. The children offer pair of coordinates where this treasure might be hidden. Continue suggesting coordinates until the treasure is found.
10 Minutes a day - Measure
The following are activities that will provide ongoing practice of key skills in measure.
Many activities are suitable for a variety of levels with a little adaptation.
Length
I Spy - Play 'I spy', with lengths. Look around the class. I spy with my little eye, something that is about 6 centimetres long. The children try to guess what you are thinking of. The first child to guess correctly 'spies' the next object. Vary the game by changing the units (to metres or decimetres).
Guess what length - Divide the children into pairs, and give each pair a piece of paper. Give an instruction, e.g. draw a line 3 cm long. Each pair draws a line that they estimate to be 3 cm long. Measure the lines. Pairs with a line that is nearly 3 cm long receive a cube. Continue with different instructions, e.g. draw a square of side 5 cm.
Area 
Squared paper - Give each child a piece of squared paper and ask them to draw a shape with an area of twelve squares . The squares must touch along at least one side (not just at the corners). Can each child create a different shape.
Metric Units
Choose a length - Choose a child, who says a length, e.g. twelve centimetres. Ask a different child to say the same length, but in a different metric unit, e.g. 120 mm or 1.2 dm. If correct, the second child can choose another and say a different length, e.g. two metres five centimetres. This activity can be repeated for weight or capacity.
Time
Days of the week - Order the days of the week. Recite them orally but starting with different days i.e. Tuesday, Wednesday etc.
Name the day - Ask the children to name the days which come '2 days after Sunday', '3 days before Sunday'.
Weeks and days - Choose a child and say a number of days, e.g. sixteen days. That child replies by saying how many weeks and days, i.e. two weeks two days. If correct, that child can choose another, and say a different number of days. Continue around the class, ensuring that the numbers stay below 30.
Telling the time
How many - Estimate how many times something can be done in one minute i.e. how many times a child could catch a ball in one minute. Ask a child to time a minute whilst the rest of the class count how many times the ball was caught.
Stop watch - Ask the children to shut their eyes and tell them that they are going to estimate half a minute. Tell them when to start. The children put their hand up and open their eyes when they think half a minute has passed. Who was the closest? Repeat the activity several times. Are the same children always closest? Vary the activity by asking the children to estimate one minute, or two minutes.

10 mins a day - Handling Data

The following are activities that will provide ongoing practice of Key Skills in Handling Data. Many activities are suitable for a variety of levels with a little adaptation.
Sets
Colour Hunt
'How many red things can we find in the classroom?'
Sorting Fun
Give the children a set of objects ie animals/shapes and ask them 'How can they be sorted?'
Classroom Sets
Select two children who can sort the rest of the class into groups. ie children with brown hair/ blue eyes.
Ask the children questions about each set. ie How many children have blue eyes? How any more children have blue eyes than brown eyes?
Venn Diagram Sorting
Give the children a Venn diagram outline and ask them each to write their name on a piece of paper.
Decide on the criteria which is to be used and ask each child in turn to put their name in the correct section. ie children who play the piano and children who play the recorder. Ask the children questions based on the information provided on the Venn diagram. Ask the children to devise their own questions for use with the Venn diagram.
Tree Sorting
Sort a box of coins using the pathways of a Tree diagram. Ask the children questions on the Tree diagram. Where would you find the coins which are round and silver.
Question Time
Show the children a completed Venn diagram and ask them questions on it. ie 'How many children do not have laces or buckles on their shoes?'
Show the children a completed bar graph and ask them questions on it. ie 'How many more children have birthdays in July then September?'
Show the children a completed pie chart and ask them questions on it. ie 'How many children go home for lunch?' Encourage the children to use language such as 'One quarter of the children go home for lunch; three quarters of the children have lunch in school.'
Repeat the above activities with the children creating their own questions
Probability
Place a piece of string on the floor. Put a marker at each end and one in the middle. If the first marker is labelled 'impossible' and the last marker is labelled 'certain' what labels could be given to the middle
marker?
Give some examples of events for each marker i.e. Tomorrow will be Saturday if today is Friday